Projects and Ideas

How to build a smartphone controlled robot car

Posted by David Husselmann on

How to build a smartphone controlled robot car

Here are some step-by-step instructions for building a two-wheeled robot car that can be steered by your smartphone via Wifi. Note: Some soldering is required to join the battery boxes together and also to connect the drive motors. Parts You will need the following parts to complete this project: Robot car chassis Battery box for 4x AA batteries - TWO of our 2x AA battery boxes An ESP8266 board like the NodeMCU. An L298N motor driver board. Jumper leads (female to male and female to female). Short pieces of hookup wire to connect the motors. Double sided tape, cable ties or...

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WiFi Door and Window Sensor

Posted by Fritz Husselmann on

WiFi Door and Window Sensor

This project is an ESP8266-based door and window sensor that can monitor two sensors at a time. It runs off a 9V battery and can run for a considerable amount of time before needing to have the battery replaced. To complete this project, you need to be able to do some light coding in the Arduino IDE. How it works The project consists of two main processors - an ATtiny85, which acts as a power management system, and an ESP-01 module which does the heavy lifting to report the status of whatever it's connected to. See also: Why do we...

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Wireless temperature and humidity sensor (MQTT enabled)

Posted by David Husselmann on

Wireless temperature and humidity sensor (MQTT enabled)

Handy for home automation projects, this wireless temperature sensor reports the current temperature and humidity to an MQTT broker of your liking every 5 seconds. Parts required 3.3V power supply DHT11 temperature and humidity sensor ESP8266 + breakout board A 4.7k resistor And of course a breadboard and some jumper leads. If you don't already have an FTDI cable and your Arduino IDE set up to go, check out this guide. Assembly Make the following connections: GND on power supply to: GND on ESP8266 GND (pin 4) on DHT11 +3.3V on power supply to: CHPD on ESP8266 VCC on ESP8266 Pin...

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Project idea: Simon game

Posted by Fritz Husselmann on

Simon is a memory game from the 1980s that revolved around the player being played, and then having to recall and play, a series of musical notes. The idea We can build a simple Simon-type game using a microcontroller like the ATtiny84, a passive buzzer that we can drive with PWM, and the breadboard, buttons and lights from the breadboard starter kit. How it might work We could program the microcontroller with a sequence of notes to create a "song". We could then make it oscillate for the passive buzzer to play this song. We can progressively play one more note...

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Talking motion detector

Posted by David Husselmann on

Talking motion detector

Combining our voice recorder with a motion sensor you can easily construct a talking alarm system that will announce any motion by a sound of your liking. Parts required 5V Power supply Jumper leads Voice recorder module Motion sensor module Assembly Set your power supply to 5V.  Using our breadboard power supply (pictured below) you can simply use the 5V output headers (there are two of them). Using female to female jumper leads, make the following connections: + on the motion sensor to 5V on the power supply - on the motion sensor to GND on the power supply VCC...

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